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stardust holiday
chronicles of the chronically (and voluntarily) bedridden

Screening Part 2: CONQUERED.

19 May 2006
Would it be strange to say that I had a good time today at the Clinic? I arrived at about 10:30am and by 11:00am I was weightless. Ricki said that all test subjects have to be suspended once during the screening process to ensure that they don't "freak out." Personally, I can't see how anyone could be the least bit uncomfortable. I can't recall a time when I felt more relaxed.

After that, Sara explained the proper procedure for wearing and removing the Pedar. This is a little computer a bit larger than a palm pilot that will monitor the pressure that I put on my feet for four days. With the data collected from those four days, Sara will be able to determine how much exercise I should do, should I be selected and assigned as an exerciser. The Pedar is small enough, but it's powered by a pack which contains 10 D-cell batteries. If you can remember the last time you used D-cells in anything, you might recall that they are not light.

Then I had lunch. Cobb salad.

After lunch, we went to the GCRC for the Treadmill Stress Test. I didn't ask exactly what was determined from this process, but one thing was painfully obvious: I am very pale. For a short while, it was thought that I might have to shave my chest so Melanie could put the EKG leads on me. But then, once my shirt was off, she said, "You're hairy in just the right places that I don't have to shave you." It was the nicest thing anyone has said to me in a while.

The treadmill test was made up of three-minute intervals, each with an increase in speed and incline. I don't really exercise much, so I was expecting 15 minutes on the treadmill to kill me. I did fairly well though, according to Melanie, and all that hurt afterward were my calf muscles.

Last on the list was a meeting with Dr. Muzita (sp?), the psychiatrist. He was a really nice guy, and brought up some points I hadn't thought of in my whole "mind-over-matter" approach to the study. Due to doctor-patient confidentiality I will refrain from listing them here, but I will say that I believe I am mentally prepared for this. Of course, I haven't laid down yet, but I like to think that I've considered everything. I'm sure there are countless things I haven't realized yet that I'll learn in the first couple of weeks in the study. Erin has gleefully accepted the position of "guru" for these matters. More testing on Tuesday... I'm honestly excited.
17:28 :: :: permalink
6 Comments:
  • It looks like you are taking a more scientific approach to your experience than Erin.

    I was always surprised by her lack of description of the process.

    A.

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 00:46  
  • It looks like you are taking a more scientific approach to your experience than Erin.

    I was always surprised by her lack of description of the process.

    A.

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 00:48  
  • It looks like you are taking a more scientific approach to your experience than Erin.

    I was always surprised by her lack of description of the process.

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 00:49  
  • I have most testing and my mental health meeting next week. Its wicked hard to do all this around work. Here's to your one on one going well.

    By Blogger Becca, at 14:56  
  • Greg, doctor-patient confidentiality prevents the doctor from talking about what he says/does unless getting permission from the patient. Since you were the patient, you can share what you were asked. I'd be interested to know what kind of things they test you on to see if you are prepared. Of course, if you signed some sort of agreement with the researchers, that would be a different story, but if you did you probably wouldn't be blogging at all.
    Please do tell about the psychological prep.

    By Anonymous Susan, at 13:07  
  • Sorry I got your name wrong George in that previous post!

    By Anonymous Susan, at 13:08  
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